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“And In One Holy Local Church”: The Ghettoization of Protestantism (3)

Part 2 of the article. The Nature and Structure of the New Testament Church By now, we have shown the nakedness of a number of mythologies so dear to modern churchmen. Mandatory “local church membership” and the related to it “vows” and “covenants” are a novelty, it came from the cults and from political pressure […]

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“And In One Holy Local Church”: The Ghettoization of Protestantism (2)

Part 1 of the article. God of Lone Rangers, Destroyer of Systems It is for this reason the Church in the past was not against, and certainly not afraid of, sending out Christians as “lone rangers,” or of accepting them as a necessary part of its own growth. In fact, in the early centuries of […]

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“And In One Holy Local Church”: The Ghettoization of Protestantism (1)

Knowing the general level of emotional sensitivity in the modern American church in general, and in the Reformed churches in particular, I need to start this article with a disclaimer: While this article is a commentary on a quote by Jeff Durbin, pastor of Apologia Church, it is not in any way an assessment of […]

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The Two-Kingdoms Doctrine’s Schizophrenic Philosophy of History

In the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision on sodomite “marriage” my Facebook news feed was filled with quite a few statements by known and unknown, important and unimportant persons and institutions who wanted to inform the world what they thought of it. One institution, though, was missing from that list, and of what I […]

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A “Post-Christian World” and a “Post-Mom Home”

No, we don’t live in a “post-Christian world.” A “post-Christian world” can not possibly exist. There has never been such a world; there will never be one. Stop using the phrase. It is bad theology. It is bad philosophy of history. It is bad evangelism. It is bad psychology. And it is false view of […]

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Christendom: Westminster’s Forgotten Legacy

A while ago, I came across a book that caught my attention: “Recovering the Reformed Confession” by R Scott Clark. At the time, I had no idea about who Scott Clark was or what he believed. But the title and the description of the book caught my attention: Much of what passes as Reformed among […]

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Missions in the Big Cities (1)

A friend of mine from Brazil, who is working to start a Reformed church in a large city, asked me a few weeks ago, “How do you do urban missions from a theonomic perspective?” It’s a very important question. In fact, I can safely predict that this will be the most important question for the […]

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Augustine’s Two Cities Are Not Horton’s Two Kingdoms

We saw in the previous article that neither the historical context of the times nor the view of Augustine concerning the Law supports the claims that Augustine ever preached or taught a two-kingdoms theology; neither can he be considered its founder. The historical context was the very century after Constantine, when emperors openly proclaimed the […]

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Augustine vs. the Two-Kingdoms Theology

The modern argument of the two kingdoms is a fairly recent development; it appeared in the late 1990s as a rhetorical retort against Theonomy. For over 20 years after the publishing of R.J. Rushdoony’s Institutes of Biblical Law (1973) and over 10 years after Greg Bahnsen’s Theonomy in Christian Ethics (1984), the Reformed seminaries – […]

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The Rhetoric at the Foundation of Capitalism, and the Ethics at the Foundation of That Rhetoric

(This is a lecture I delivered on October 20, 2012, to the Fourth Annual Adam Smith Forum in Moscow Russia, organized by the Libertarian Party of Russia. The lecture was part of a panel discussion on the “Moral Sentiments of Capitalism,” with Deirdre McCloskey of Chicago University and Tom Palmer of Cato Institute.) It is […]

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