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Augustine’s Two Cities Are Not Horton’s Two Kingdoms

We saw in the previous article that neither the historical context of the times nor the view of Augustine concerning the Law supports the claims that Augustine ever preached or taught a two-kingdoms theology; neither can he be considered its founder. The historical context was the very century after Constantine, when emperors openly proclaimed the […]

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Augustine vs. the Two-Kingdoms Theology

The modern argument of the two kingdoms is a fairly recent development; it appeared in the late 1990s as a rhetorical retort against Theonomy. For over 20 years after the publishing of R.J. Rushdoony’s Institutes of Biblical Law (1973) and over 10 years after Greg Bahnsen’s Theonomy in Christian Ethics (1984), the Reformed seminaries – […]

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Lycurgus of Sparta

The Shadow of Christ in the Legal Revolutions in Greece and Rome (Part 2)

The Legal Revolutions  Before Lycurgus returned to Sparta from his journeys to start his legal revolution, Sparta had the worst government in the world. The city was in a perpetual civil war between the clans, and the royal authority – which had never been strong in the Greek city-states anyway – was disintegrating. Lycurgus’s father, […]

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The Shadow of Christ in the Legal Revolutions in Greece and Rome (Part I)

. . . an entire nation appeared, sprung from the Hebrews and practicing the true religion. To them, through the prophet Moses, he revealed images and symbols of a mystical Sabbath and of circumcision, as well as instruction in other spiritual principles, but no complete revelation of the mysteries, for they were still bound by […]

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